August 26th, 2012

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

(Source: hermionejg, via teachingliteracy)

August 25th, 2012

Done by Ryan Rader at Sacred Keystone; Altoona, Pa. 

Done by Ryan Rader at Sacred Keystone; Altoona, Pa. 

(Source: fuckyeahtattoos)

August 24th, 2012

Borders by Denis Radenkovic on Flickr.

Borders by Denis Radenkovic on Flickr.

(Source: bookporn)

August 23rd, 2012

Algemon, Detroit, photographed by Andrew Moore

Algemon, Detroit, photographed by Andrew Moore

August 22nd, 2012
But someday you will be old enough to start reading fairytales again.
C.S. Lewis, The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays

(Source: mbgera, via thegirlandherbooks)

August 21st, 2012

(Source: truthe, via teacoffeebooks)

August 20th, 2012
sugarmeows:

Portrait of a gentlemen (cabinet card, 1890s)

sugarmeows:

Portrait of a gentlemen (cabinet card, 1890s)

(Source: carolathhabsburg)

Rape is rape. And the idea that we should be parsing and qualifying and slicing what types of rape we are talking about doesn’t make sense to the American people and certainly doesn’t make sense to me. So what I think these comments do underscore is why we shouldn’t have a bunch of politicians, a majority of whom are men, making health care decisions on behalf of women.
April 8th, 2012

Source
In the late 1880s, the body of a 16-year-old girl was pulled from the Seine. She was apparently a suicide, as her body showed no marks of violence, but her beauty and her enigmatic smile led a Paris pathologist to order a plaster death mask of her face.
In the romantic atmosphere of fin de siècle Europe the girl’s face became an ideal of feminine beauty. The protagonist of Rainer Maria Rilke’s 1910 novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge writes, “The mouleur, whose shop I pass every day, has hung two plaster masks beside his door. [One is] the face of the young drowned woman, which they took a cast of in the morgue, because it was beautiful, because it smiled, because it smiled so deceptively, as if it knew.”
Ironically, in 1958 the anonymous girl’s features were used to model the first-aid mannequin Rescue Annie, on which thousands of students have practiced CPR. Though the girl’s identity remains a mystery, her face, it’s said, has become “the most kissed face of all time.”

Source

In the late 1880s, the body of a 16-year-old girl was pulled from the Seine. She was apparently a suicide, as her body showed no marks of violence, but her beauty and her enigmatic smile led a Paris pathologist to order a plaster death mask of her face.

In the romantic atmosphere of fin de siècle Europe the girl’s face became an ideal of feminine beauty. The protagonist of Rainer Maria Rilke’s 1910 novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge writes, “The mouleur, whose shop I pass every day, has hung two plaster masks beside his door. [One is] the face of the young drowned woman, which they took a cast of in the morgue, because it was beautiful, because it smiled, because it smiled so deceptively, as if it knew.”

Ironically, in 1958 the anonymous girl’s features were used to model the first-aid mannequin Rescue Annie, on which thousands of students have practiced CPR. Though the girl’s identity remains a mystery, her face, it’s said, has become “the most kissed face of all time.”

(via dearprongs)